Facilities

College of Science and Mathematics Faculty and students invent, use, and share state-of-the-art research tools, microscopes, and advanced analytical labs, which allow them to think big and create extraordinary research programs. The facilities our people have access to include, but are not limited to:

  • Photo of students and faculty in the Animal Care - Aquatics facilityKennesaw State's Animal Care - Aquatics Facility is a newly renovated and expanded facility specifically designed for aquatic vertebrate research. This facility consists of separate temperature and light controlled rooms for recreating optimal conditions for model system, emerging system and novel research vertebrates, as well as wild-caught species. Coldwater, temperate, and tropical taxa - freshwater, brackish, and marine - can be accommodated comfortably for both research and teaching activities.

    • Sony Biosciences SH800 Cell Sorter
    • BD Acurri C6 Flow Cytometer
    • FlowJo Flow Cytometry Analysis Software
    • Data Image Legend
  • Photo of the Histology Core FacilityKennesaw State’s Histology Core Facility houses the latest specialized equipment needed to prepare high-quality histological sections for molecular, cellular, and anatomical based research projects. The facility is housed in the 300-square foot research Science laboratory and includes aLeica CM180 Cryostat, a Microm 650V Vibratome, and a Microm 360 Rotary microtome. This suite of equipment allows for the preparation of sections from frozen, paraffin, and agarose-embedded specimens, as well as both fixed and unfixed specimens.

    In addition, the facility houses paraffin incubators, slide warmers, wet bench workspace, ample storage space, a fume hood, and a dedicated workstation. Please contact the Facility Coordinator, Anton Bryantsev, for more information.

    • Leica CM1850 Cryostat
      Minimum –35 °C chamber temperature, actively cooled quick freeze shelf with Peltier unit for freezing down to –60 °C. Splash-protected microtome, with two-speed motorized coarse feed. Smooth specimen orientation with automatic centering, and the lateral displacement feature of knife holder for disposable blades allows the use of the entire blade length without need to reposition the blade. A glass anti-roll guide integrated into the holder is automatically positioned with blade movement. Serial sections down to 3 μm are easily obtained. Advanced scheduling for use is required. Proper training is required for all researchers prior to use of this equipment. Funded by Georgia Research Alliance.
    • Microm 650V Vibratome
      The vibrating blade has been designed for sectioning fresh tissue, such as spinal cord, brain, and botanical specimens. This gentle sectioning method is also useful for sectioning many types of fixed tissues. Amplitude and frequency are set independently and optimized for each specimen. Two section thicknesses can be programmed between 1 and 1500 μm. Rapid return travel of the blade carriage (5 mm/sec) allows for efficient sectioning. Larger specimens can be accommodated by the 50mm horizontal programmable cutting window. Cutting speed is adjustable continuously between 0 – 50 mm/sec in 0.1 mm/sec-increments. Advanced scheduling for use is required. Proper training is required for all researchers prior to use of this equipment.
    • Microm 360 Rotary Microtome
      Rotary microtomes are designed for sectioning of paraffin, semi-thin, and hard fixed specimens. The Microm 360 is touch pad keyboard controlled for thickness (trim: 5 to 500µms; section: 0.25 to 60µm), mode (single, interval, and continuous stroke), and speed with additional manual and/or foot pedal control options. Vertical specimen stroke is 64mm. Advanced scheduling for use is required. Proper training is required for all researchers prior to use of this equipment.
  • Within this diversity of plant species you will see benches overflowing with research projects. Graduate students in the Masters of Science in Integrative Biology degree program, Deayne Johnson and Eric Duncan research root fungus, grasses and restoriation. Research by Deayne Johnson is looking at the effectiveness of mycorrhizae-grass associations in the phytoextraction of heavy metals from the soil. While the research of Eric Duncan is comparing water use and drought resistance of two riparian species of Georgia.

    Research interests of Joel McNeal, Assistant Professor of Biology, is looking at the parasitic plant dodder (Cuscuta sp., a yellow and orange stringy vines) and how it finds and colonizes its hosts.

    You will find Amborella, a genus thought to be the very base of the angiosperm lineage. The smallest known flowering plant species, an aquatic plant in the genus Wolffia is there. This flower is so small you have to look at it under a microscope!

    Not to be ignored, plants in the genus Amorphophallus may hold the dubious honor of having in its midst some of the smelliest plants are also found among the collection in the greenhouse. These beautiful - putrid smelling plant specimens came into flower spring semester, passers-by thought something had died near the greenhouse.

    There are carnivorous plants in the Nepenthaceae, Cephalotaceae, and Sarraceniaceae families - as well as the sundew and butterwort families- Droseraceae and Lentibulariaceae. Plants from the outstanding collection have been used in plant morphology, plant ecology and plant systematics classes.

    • Outside view of the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse at Kennesaw State University
    • Sigurdur Greipsson, Ph.D. (center) and students inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Students conducting research inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Watering plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial GreenhousePlants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Plants inside the Joyce and Ira Pegues Memorial Greenhouse
    • Zeiss LSM 700 Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope and Integrated Workshop
    • Olympus IX71 Inverted Fluorescent Microscope
    • Olympus BX61 Compound Microscope
    • Olympus SZX16 Fluorescent Dissection Microscope
  • The Oasis, a hands-on outdoor classroom, is one of most unique and innovative laboratory spaces on campus, that will enable biology students to study native Georgia plant life.

    The Oasis was built in the unused courtyard space between the Science building, and the Science Laboratory building. This initiative, which includes a water basin containing and surrounded by a diverse array of plant species, was funded by a generous donor, Dr. Joseph Cook, and named "The Oasis" by the College of Science and Mathematics students in the CSM Courtyard naming contest. Construction for Phase I was completed in the Summer of 2014. Phase II was completed in 2019.

    • The Oasis - Outdoor Classroom original concept rendering
    • The old College of Science and Mathematics courtyard
    • The Oasis - Beginning construction
    • The Oasis - Under construction
    • The Oasis - Under construction
    • The Oasis - Pond aerial view
    • The Oasis - Plants being planted
    • CSM Courtyard Contest Winners and Dr. Anderson
    • The Oasis
    • The Oasis
    • The Oasis sign unveiling
    • The Oasis - Outdoor Classroom
    • Second phase of the Oasis
    • Second phase of the Oasis
    • Second phase of the Oasis
    • Second phase of the Oasis

    Photo of Joseph CookAbout the Donor: Meet Dr. Joseph Cook. His generosity has launched one of most unique and innovative projects developed on campus, a hands-on outdoor classroom that will enable biology students to study native Georgia plant life. Read the Article »

  • Photo of the Science LaboratoryThe Science Laboratory provides an environment that enables highly effective collaboration for research and teaching. The design of Kennesaw State's Science Laboratory provides the academic components necessary for future flexibility, leading to undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry and Biochemistry.

    The Science Laboratory promotes teaching methods that benefit all science students and interdisciplinary research. Thanks to the new KSU Science Laboratory, Kennesaw State can meet the educational and technological challenges of the 21st century with upgraded facilities, expanded course offerings and increased research opportunities.

    The Science Laboratory provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate research. With these upgraded laboratory facilities, Kennesaw State continues to become a premier undergraduate science institution for the state of Georgia.

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