Faculty Research Spotlight

The Faculty Research Spotlight is intended to introduce students to Department of Mathematics faculty research interests, but everyone is welcome to attend!

In Fall 2020, all talks will be scheduled from 2:30-3:30pm and will be held virtually in Microsoft Teams: Link to Join.

Upcoming Events

Monday, September 28, 2020

  • SPEAKER: Dr. Eric Stachura
  • RESEARCH AREA: Partial Differential Equations
  • TIME/LOCATION: 2:30-3:30pm online in Microsoft Teams: Link to Join
  • TITLE: "Differential equations in Electromagnetism"
  • ABSTRACT: Differential equations are useful to study many natural phenomena. In this talk, I will discuss differential equations which arise in Electromagnetism. In particular, I will show how scattering of Electromagnetic waves by obstacles has applications to radar surveillance and medical imaging, among many other areas. I will then introduce Geometric Optics and pose an optical refraction problem, where we will see nonlinear differential equations appear. Finally, I will address an issue in Electrical Engineering (Passive Intermodulation) which is important for the design of modern communication systems. I will end with some open problems and some differential equations in other physical contexts, including quantum mechanics and electromechanics.

Monday, October 12, 2020

  • SPEAKER: Dr. Tsz Ho Chan
  • RESEARCH AREA: Number Theory
  • TIME/LOCATION: 2:30-3:30pm online in Microsoft Teams: Link to Join
  • TITLE: TBA
  • ABSTRACT: TBA

Monday, October 26, 2020

  • SPEAKER: Dr. Pengcheng Xiao
  • RESEARCH AREA: Mathematical Biology
  • TIME/LOCATION: 2:30-3:30pm online in Microsoft Teams: Link to Join
  • TITLE: TBA
  • ABSTRACT: TBA

 

Past Events

Monday, August 31, 2020

  • SPEAKER: Dr. Sarah Holliday
  • RESEARCH AREA: Graph Theory
  • TIME/LOCATION: 2:30-3:30pm online in Microsoft Teams
  • TITLE: "Graph Designs; from cookie baking to ship captains"
  • ABSTRACT: We can use techniques from the intersection of graph theory and design theory to solve problems in the area of scheduling and experimental design. I've been working on a variant of one problem for many years, and while I have made some impressive strides over the years, there is still a great deal of work to be done.

Monday, September 14, 2020

  • SPEAKER: Dr. Andy Wilson
  • RESEARCH AREA: Combinatorics/Algebra
  • TIME/LOCATION: 2:30-3:30pm online in Microsoft Teams
  • TITLE: "The mathematics of voting districts"
  • ABSTRACT: The US House of Representatives consists of 435 voting members, each representing a district. Each state is allocated a certain number of districts based on its population. There are surprisingly few legal restrictions on how these districts can be drawn, allowing officials to sometimes draw "unfair" maps that are usually called "gerrymanders." In recent years, mathematicians have developed several methods for detecting and avoiding gerrymanders. I will give an overview of some of these methods, which involve techniques from graph theory and probability, and discuss open problems in this area.

 

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